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1800s

Undergarments

Women
chemise
drawers
regency petticoat
chemisette / camisole
short bust corset
corded stays
1/2 bust corset
underbust / waist sinch

Men
shirt
corset
drawers / long underware

Outerwear

Women
Empire dress
spencer jacket
romantic era dress
early Victorian dress
gored skirt
pagoda bodice
Zouave jacket
artistic / aesthetic dress
tea gown
princess cut gown
cuirass bodice
skirt with train
polonaise
gored skirt
shirtwaist
riding habit

Men
waistcoat / vest
tailcoat
fall front pants
fly front pants
frock coat
morning coat
sack coat
overcoat
cloak

Accessories

Women
cloak / mantle
muff
engageantes / false sleeves
purse / bag
shawl
pelerine
pelisse

Men
cravat / stock
cravat pad
pocket book

 

1500

1600

1700

1800

1800s

Undergarments

Women
chemise
drawers
regency petticoat
chemisette / camisole
short bust corset
corded stays
1/2 bust corset
underbust / waist sinch

Men
shirt
corset
drawers / long underware

Outerwear

Women
Empire dress
spencer jacket
romantic era dress
early Victorian dress
gored skirt
pagoda bodice
Zouave jacket
artistic / aesthetic dress
tea gown
princess cut gown
cuirass bodice
skirt with train
polonaise
gored skirt
shirtwaist
riding habit

Men
waistcoat / vest
tailcoat
fall front pants
fly front pants
frock coat
morning coat
sack coat
overcoat
cloak

Accessories

Women
cloak / mantle
muff
engageantes / false sleeves
purse / bag
shawl
pelerine
pelisse

Men
cravat / stock
cravat pad
pocket book

 

1500

1600

1700

1800

 19th Century Women's Outerwear

 

Empire Dress:

#1800L13

Starts at $100 to sew + materials
prices will vary widely according to design

Muslin, linen, silk, satin, wool, velvet, other
+ $20 sleeve supports

1795-1820's. Regency style dress. White was the most popular color for eveningwear, pastels were favored for day wear. Lightweight fabrics for spring and summer, heavier fabrics for fall and winter.  This dress is very elegant and flatters most figures.  Brighter colors came into fashion in the teens & 20's.

 

Spencer Jacket:

 

#1800L14
Starts at $80 to sew + materials
Wool, velvet, silk, linen, other

 

1795-1820's. The Spencer jacket was worn for extra warmth in winter and as protection from the sun in the summer. Traditionally it has a high waist and long sleeves, but they can be of any length.  Winter versions closed in the front, summer jackets were open or low-cut.

Any number of trim styles & decoration can be used.

 

Romantic Era Dress:

#1800L15
Starts at $200 to sew + materials
prices will vary widely according to the design
Cotton print, silk, brocade, velvet, linen, other.
+ $20 belt + buckle.
+ $20 small sleeve supports
+ $30  large sleeve supports

 

1830’s. The Romantic era dresses went through several changes, but were characterized by a small waist, conical skirt and very big sleeves. In the early years wide belts & sashes were popular, later waistbands became pointed.  At the end of the decade the fullness of the sleeve moved down the arm.

 

 

 

 

 

Early Victorian Dress:

 

#180016
Starts at $250 to sew + materials
prices will vary widely according to the design

 

1840’s. Narrow, sloped shoulders restrict arm movement giving women a very “feminine” posture. The waist comes to a narrow point and multiple petticoats support wide skirts. The practice of making day and evening bodices to match a skirt began in this decade. Day bodices have a high neckline, evening bodices are usually off the shoulder with short sleeves. Skirts should be worn over a starched & corded petticoat, or multiple layers of petticoats to achieve the desired fullness.

 

 

 

 

 

Gored Skirt:

 

#1800L17
Starts at $100 to sew + materials
prices will vary slightly according to design

 

1850’s & 60’s. This gored skirt fits over a hoop petticoat or crinoline.  There are two styles, the first is designed to go over a round hoop and the second fits an elliptical crinoline.  Both can be worn with bustles by tying up the excess fabric, which is exactly what women of the 19th century did!

 

Truly Victorian 240 Ball Gown Skirt(s) shown here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pagoda Bodice

#1800L18
Starts at $120 to sew + materials

 

1850’s & 60’s. This mid century bodice has triangular sleeves with the fullness at the wrist. Engageantes were worn underneath it to cover the arms. This bodice can be cut high or low for day and evening wear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zouave Jacket

#1800L19

Starts at $80 to sew + materials
wool, linen, silk, velvet, other

1860’s. Zouave jackets were inspired by military dress, and are similar to Spencer jackets. They are short-waisted, button at the neck and fall away to curve around the back. Much like a cardigan today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artistic / Aesthetic Dress:
#1800L20
Starts at $100 to sew + materials
Prices will vary widely according to the design

1860 - 1900. Inspired by the Pre Raphaelite art movement, many of these dresses were similar to Regency styles, early Renaissance and fantasy Medieval styles. Artistic dresses are characterized by a more “natural” form and an uncorseted figure.


 

 

Tea Gown:

#1800L21

Starts at $200 to sew + materials
Prices will vary slightly according to the design

1870’s. Tea gowns were artistic-inspired gowns with a loose & flowing sack back, worn with or without a corset. Tea gowns were worn for informal entertaining in the home or having tea at a family member’s house.  The bodices can be lightly boned or soft.

 

 

Princess Cut Gown:

#1800L22
Starts at $250 to sew + materials
prices will vary widely according to the design
this dress requires fittings.

 

1870’s. The princess gown is made from panels and gores that go from neck to hem. It is form-fitting from neck to knees then flairs out with a long train and many embellishments. Fabrics were light and airy silks or sheers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cuirass Bodice:

 

#1800L23
Starts at $120 to sew + materials

 

1870’s A long waisted, form-fitting bodice that fits over a bustle.  It is often boned.

 

Skirt with a train:

 

#1800L24
Starts at $50 to sew + materials
Prices will vary widely according to the amount of trim

 

1870’s. This is a very elegant A-line skirt with a train. The extensive use of trim disguises the simple design.

 

 

 

Polonaise:

#1800L25
Starts at $150 to sew + materials
Prices will vary slightly according to the design

 

1880's.  The polonaise is a recurring fashion trend, and as always, very popular.  Polonaise gowns could be of any length or cut, they could have squared off fronts, rounded skirts, low or high necklines... just about any variation that other garments of the time had.  The defining feature of this garment is the pick-up bustle skirt and cut-away front.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gored Skirt:

#1800L26
$50 to sew + materials

 

1890’s. This gored skirt fits nicely over a small bustle or can be worn on its own. It falls smoothly to create a very clean look.

The skirt pictured is an 1870 or 1886 All Round Skirt from an original magazine plate (the plate was published in both years).

 

Shirtwaist:

 

#1800L27
Starts at $45 to sew + materials
Prices may vary slightly according to the design
cotton, linen

 

1890’s day wear button-down shirt. 

 

 

Riding Habit:

#1800L28
Starts at $250 to sew + materials
Prices will vary widely according to the design

 

Styles change depending on region and year.  As always, women's riding habits echoed men's fashions.  Our riding habits include an under-vest, petticoat & jacket (which are sometimes sewn together).

 

Pelisse:

#1800L32
Starts at $120 to sew + materials
Prices will vary according to the design
wool, velvet, silk, cotton, linen.

 

The Pelisse was worn from 1800 to around 1850 when skirts became too large for the garment.  It is an overcoat that can be lined or trimmed with fur for winter wear, or made from lightweight material for summer evenings.  The Pelisse can be knee to ankle length and often has a military flair.

Pair it with a muff, shawl or gloves.

 19th Century Women's Outerwear

 

Empire Dress:

#1800L13

Starts at $100 to sew + materials
prices will vary widely according to design

Muslin, linen, silk, satin, wool, velvet, other
+ $20 sleeve supports

1795-1820's. Regency style dress. White was the most popular color for eveningwear, pastels were favored for day wear. Lightweight fabrics for spring and summer, heavier fabrics for fall and winter.  This dress is very elegant and flatters most figures.  Brighter colors came into fashion in the teens & 20's.

 

Spencer Jacket:

 

#1800L14
Starts at $80 to sew + materials
Wool, velvet, silk, linen, other

 

1795-1820's. The Spencer jacket was worn for extra warmth in winter and as protection from the sun in the summer. Traditionally it has a high waist and long sleeves, but they can be of any length.  Winter versions closed in the front, summer jackets were open or low-cut.

Any number of trim styles & decoration can be used.

 

Romantic Era Dress:

#1800L15
Starts at $200 to sew + materials
prices will vary widely according to the design
Cotton print, silk, brocade, velvet, linen, other.
+ $20 belt + buckle.
+ $20 small sleeve supports
+ $30  large sleeve supports

 

1830’s. The Romantic era dresses went through several changes, but were characterized by a small waist, conical skirt and very big sleeves. In the early years wide belts & sashes were popular, later waistbands became pointed.  At the end of the decade the fullness of the sleeve moved down the arm.

 

 

 

 

 

Early Victorian Dress:

 

#180016
Starts at $250 to sew + materials
prices will vary widely according to the design

 

1840’s. Narrow, sloped shoulders restrict arm movement giving women a very “feminine” posture. The waist comes to a narrow point and multiple petticoats support wide skirts. The practice of making day and evening bodices to match a skirt began in this decade. Day bodices have a high neckline, evening bodices are usually off the shoulder with short sleeves. Skirts should be worn over a starched & corded petticoat, or multiple layers of petticoats to achieve the desired fullness.

 

 

 

 

 

Gored Skirt:

 

#1800L17
Starts at $100 to sew + materials
prices will vary slightly according to design

 

1850’s & 60’s. This gored skirt fits over a hoop petticoat or crinoline.  There are two styles, the first is designed to go over a round hoop and the second fits an elliptical crinoline.  Both can be worn with bustles by tying up the excess fabric, which is exactly what women of the 19th century did!

 

Truly Victorian 240 Ball Gown Skirt(s) shown here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pagoda Bodice

#1800L18
Starts at $120 to sew + materials

 

1850’s & 60’s. This mid century bodice has triangular sleeves with the fullness at the wrist. Engageantes were worn underneath it to cover the arms. This bodice can be cut high or low for day and evening wear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zouave Jacket

#1800L19

Starts at $80 to sew + materials
wool, linen, silk, velvet, other

1860’s. Zouave jackets were inspired by military dress, and are similar to Spencer jackets. They are short-waisted, button at the neck and fall away to curve around the back. Much like a cardigan today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artistic / Aesthetic Dress:
#1800L20
Starts at $100 to sew + materials
Prices will vary widely according to the design

1860 - 1900. Inspired by the Pre Raphaelite art movement, many of these dresses were similar to Regency styles, early Renaissance and fantasy Medieval styles. Artistic dresses are characterized by a more “natural” form and an uncorseted figure.


 

 

Tea Gown:

#1800L21

Starts at $200 to sew + materials
Prices will vary slightly according to the design

1870’s. Tea gowns were artistic-inspired gowns with a loose & flowing sack back, worn with or without a corset. Tea gowns were worn for informal entertaining in the home or having tea at a family member’s house.  The bodices can be lightly boned or soft.

 

 

Princess Cut Gown:

#1800L22
Starts at $250 to sew + materials
prices will vary widely according to the design
this dress requires fittings.

 

1870’s. The princess gown is made from panels and gores that go from neck to hem. It is form-fitting from neck to knees then flairs out with a long train and many embellishments. Fabrics were light and airy silks or sheers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cuirass Bodice:

 

#1800L23
Starts at $120 to sew + materials

 

1870’s A long waisted, form-fitting bodice that fits over a bustle.  It is often boned.

 

Skirt with a train:

 

#1800L24
Starts at $50 to sew + materials
Prices will vary widely according to the amount of trim

 

1870’s. This is a very elegant A-line skirt with a train. The extensive use of trim disguises the simple design.

 

 

 

Polonaise:

#1800L25
Starts at $150 to sew + materials
Prices will vary slightly according to the design

 

1880's.  The polonaise is a recurring fashion trend, and as always, very popular.  Polonaise gowns could be of any length or cut, they could have squared off fronts, rounded skirts, low or high necklines... just about any variation that other garments of the time had.  The defining feature of this garment is the pick-up bustle skirt and cut-away front.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gored Skirt:

#1800L26
$50 to sew + materials

 

1890’s. This gored skirt fits nicely over a small bustle or can be worn on its own. It falls smoothly to create a very clean look.

The skirt pictured is an 1870 or 1886 All Round Skirt from an original magazine plate (the plate was published in both years).

 

Shirtwaist:

 

#1800L27
Starts at $45 to sew + materials
Prices may vary slightly according to the design
cotton, linen

 

1890’s day wear button-down shirt. 

 

 

Riding Habit:

#1800L28
Starts at $250 to sew + materials
Prices will vary widely according to the design

 

Styles change depending on region and year.  As always, women's riding habits echoed men's fashions.  Our riding habits include an under-vest, petticoat & jacket (which are sometimes sewn together).

 

Pelisse:

#1800L32
Starts at $120 to sew + materials
Prices will vary according to the design
wool, velvet, silk, cotton, linen.

 

The Pelisse was worn from 1800 to around 1850 when skirts became too large for the garment.  It is an overcoat that can be lined or trimmed with fur for winter wear, or made from lightweight material for summer evenings.  The Pelisse can be knee to ankle length and often has a military flair.

Pair it with a muff, shawl or gloves.

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